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RWD is full service interior design firm. Bringing nothing but the absolute best to their clients from beginning to end. RWD will stop at nothing to make sure their clients are happy on all levels. From designing hand made pieces of furniture, fabric selection, stone work, even down to your sheets and bath towels. Whether it is a beach home, NYC loft, mountain get away or a commercial space, RWD will deliver on the clients' dreams and imaginations.

 
 
 
 

STUDIO CITY

With baby boy number two on the way, Jamie-Lynn Sigler, 36, and her pro baseball player husband, Cutter Dykstra, 28, needed their Los Angeles home to reflect their growing family. “We felt like this could really be our forever home,” Sigler tells PEOPLE.COM. “For that reason, we wanted to take the time and invest, so it would be everything we would want in a house.” Because they built the house from the ground up, the couple needed a little help adding character throughout — which is where interior designer Ryan White stepped in.“The moment you meet Jamie, you’re struck by her genuine warmth,” White told the site. “Her home had to encapsulate that, which, let’s be honest, isn’t always a given in a new construction.” “New homebuilders have started to land the larger closets and marble kitchen islands we love but often leave the architecture lacking in personality,” White continues. “Jamie Lynn Sigler and I worked to bake that in, to give her a home that wouldn’t feel like every other house on the block.” -PEOPLE.COM

 

MALIBU

“Los Angeles based designer Ryan White, describing his first design challenge—the renovation of an overwrought pink, turquoise, and glass block ’80s beach house for two entertainment industry gents he had just met on vacation in the Mediterranean. “We had them over for drinks back at our house in Los Angeles,” White says. “I knew they lived in a modern, James Bond-type house in the Hollywood Hills, so before they came over, I wasn’t even sure if they would like our house!” he says, laughing. But the couple fell in love with “the chill vibe” that White had created in his own home, along with the designer’s brand of young-American-meets collected-comfort aesthetic. So much so, in fact, that his new friends-turned clients handed him the keys to their just-purchased getaway house on Malibu’s only private off-leash beach and gave him total design freedom. “They didn’t need to see anything until the day of the reveal,” White says, still showing the same enthusiasm and gratitude for their trust as the day he landed the job. The secret to his success was the same as for many Hollywood creatives: total focus and immersion. (He did come to L.A. to be an actor, after all.) “I literally went there every single day for the next 10 weeks,” White says. “At times, I even slept over to receive early morning deliveries.” -Traditional Home Magazine

 

beverly hills

A house never really feels like home unless it’s filled with distinctive furnishings that reflect the personalities of the people who live there. “They’re very bohemian, but they’re also sophisticated and love Tom Ford,” designer Ryan White says, describing his recent clients, a young couple who run a large fashion company in Los Angeles. “I wanted them to walk in their house and feel like there’s a symphony going on, like every room is a different experience but they’re all in tune.” -Luxe Magazine

 

LOS ANGELES

Located in a little niche of Los Angeles known for its oversized lots and 1920s architecture, the Spanish-style house hides behind a high hedge—private and a bit enigmatic. “I used to walk my dogs by this house and try to peek through the hedge,” the designer confesses. “I daydreamed about living here.” Now that he does, the home has taken on a personality that reflects its inhabitants—and belies its once transitional status. Timeless elements add a depth and personality that is anything but fleeting. A Milo Baughman coffee table adds vintage appeal to the living room. A refinished T.H. Robsjohn-Gibbings coffee table shines in the atrium. A Karl Springer scroll table brings curvaceous appeal to the home’s galley kitchen. “Pieces with history are important to the mix,” Ryan explains. “I like spaces that make you feel as if you’re being transported to another place or time, depending on the pieces in the room.” -Traditional Home Magazine

 

HOLLYWOOD HILLS

When it comes to furnishing his clients homes, designer Ryan White takes it personally. "I ask myself if I would get excited to wake up to a space everyday", he says. "As long as I could answer 'yes', then it's good."  It's a guiding principle that has served him admirably as he has segued from a career as a model and actor to interior design, where he brings a thoughtful, collected approach to his projects. This track happened to be particularly useful as he helped his clients navigate the transition of their 1920s Spanish-style home in the Hollywood Hills from a melange of assorted furniture to a personality-filled interior better suited to their current lives. -Luxe Magazine  

 

DOWNTOWN LOFT

When Bill Harrison, CEO of public relations agency Fifteen Minutes, enlisted LA-based interior designer Ryan White to transform the living room of his five-bedroom apartment in iconic Koreatown building The Talmadge, he gave the designer free reign, save for a couple of requests: that White keep Harrison's pair of blue velvet Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams sofas, and that he channel the Hollywood essence of the storied '20s structure, which was built by movie producer Joseph M. Schenck for his wife, silent screen actress and real-life Sunset Boulevard inspiration Norma Talmadge. In the end, White pulled off a tailored, glamorous revamp; we caught up with the designer to get the low-down on how he did it. -My Domaine.com

 

WEST HOLLYWOOD

White cites his home state "Colorado" as a major influence on his aesthetic. "Nature is never far from my mind--the colors, textures and inspiration," he says, adding that while there's "lots of Americana in my work," it's leavened by the years he spent in New York and the Hamptons. "Environment 100 percent affects my design sensibility."- Angeleno Magazine